Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE VALLEY OF THE NILE.
THE PTOLEMIES.
ALEXANDRIA.
CLEOPATRA'S FATHER.
ACCESSION TO THE THRONE.
CLEOPATRA AND Caesar.
THE ALEXANDRINE WAR.
CLEOPATRA A QUEEN.
THE BATTLE OF PHILIPPI.
CLEOPATRA AND ANTONY.
THE BATTLE OF ACTIUM.
THE END OF CLEOPATRA.

taking her to Rome, and marrying her there; and he took measures for 

having the laws of the city altered so as to enable him to do so, though 

he was already married. 

 

All these things produced great discontent and disaffection among 

Caesar's friends and throughout the Roman army. The Egyptians, too, 

strongly censured the conduct of Cleopatra. A son was born to her about 

this time, whom the Alexandrians named, from his father, Caesarion. 

Cleopatra was regarded in the new relation of mother, which she now 

sustained, not with interest and sympathy, but with feelings of reproach 

and condemnation. 

 

Cleopatra was all this time growing more and more accomplished, and more 

and more beautiful; but her vivacity and spirit, which had been so 

charming while it was simple and childlike, now began to appear more 

forward and bold. It is the characteristic of pure and lawful love to 

soften and subdue the heart, and infuse a gentle and quiet spirit into 

all its action; while that which breaks over the barriers that God and 

nature have marked out for it, tends to make woman masculine and bold, 

to indurate all her sensibilities, and to destroy that gentleness and 

timidity of demeanor which have so great an influence in heightening her 

charms. Cleopatra was beginning to experience these effects. She was 

indifferent to the opinions of her subjects, and was only anxious to 

maintain as long as possible her guilty ascendency over Caesar. 

 

Caesar, however, finally determined to set out on his return to the 

capital. Leaving Cleopatra, accordingly, a sufficient force to secure 

the continuance of her power, he embarked the remainder of his forces in 

his transports and galleys, and sailed away. He took the unhappy ArsinoŽ 

with him, intending to exhibit her as a trophy of his Egyptian victories 

on his arrival at Rome. 

 


Page 7 from 7:  Back   1   2   3   4   5   6  [7]