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THE VALLEY OF THE NILE.
THE PTOLEMIES.
ALEXANDRIA.
CLEOPATRA'S FATHER.
ACCESSION TO THE THRONE.
CLEOPATRA AND Caesar.
THE ALEXANDRINE WAR.
CLEOPATRA A QUEEN.
THE BATTLE OF PHILIPPI.
CLEOPATRA AND ANTONY.
THE BATTLE OF ACTIUM.
THE END OF CLEOPATRA.

splendor and renown. The nation, too, would, in such a case, pay for its 

metropolis the same price, precisely, that the ancient Egyptians paid 

for theirs. 

 

The Ptolemies expended the revenues which they raised by this taxation 

mainly in a very liberal and enlightened manner, for the accomplishment 

of the purposes which they had in view. The building of the Pharos, the 

removal of the statue of Serapis, and the endowment of the Museum and 

the library were great conceptions, and they were carried into effect in 

the most complete and perfect manner. All the other operations which 

they devised and executed for the extension and aggrandizement of the 

city were conceived and executed in the same spirit of scientific and 

enlightened liberality. Streets were opened; the most splendid palaces 

were built; docks, piers and breakwaters were constructed, and 

fortresses and towers were armed and garrisoned. Then every means was 

employed to attract to the city a great concourse from all the most 

highly-civilized nations then existing. The highest inducements were 

offered to merchants, mechanics, and artisans to make the city their 

abode. Poets, painters, sculptors, and scholars of every nation and 

degree were made welcome, and every facility was afforded them for the 

prosecution of their various pursuits. These plans were all eminently 

successful. Alexandria rose rapidly to the highest consideration and 

importance; and, at the time when Cleopatra--born to preside over this 

scene of magnificence and splendor--came upon the stage, the city had 

but one rival in the world. That rival was Rome. 

 


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